Animating Cartoons Summer Day Camp In West Seattle

Summer Pop Up 2016 PHONE 5

Animating Cartoons Summer Day-Camp for ages 9-14 (West Seattle)

Unified Outreach @ Ginomai Art Center in West Seattle provides a unique Summer Day-Camp option for Parents who are interested in seeing their child attain a stronger grasp of Arts & Technology in a fun and exciting environment.

An average afternoon of Summer Day-Camp will include educational exercises embedded in fun games designed to encourage personal growth, positive self-esteem and team building skills. The day will also include physical activities and outdoor time (as weather allows) including lunch in the park. But the highlight of each day will be working on the creation of a personal cartoon-animation using the kids’ own ideas, stories, drawings and voices; of which they will have their very own DVD to show to friends and family.

NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY! Our students are coached by knowledgeable, skilled instructors who will work with the kids each step of the way; from story development, to character design, digital imaging, cartoon animation, and voice-overs using industry-level production software including Adobe Photoshop, Flash, Soundbooth, and more.

Day Camp dates are: June 23 –June 27 June 30 – July 4 (yes we are open on 7/4) July 7 – July 11

Doors open at 8:30am and close at 5:30pm – Parents may drop off their child at any time during operational hours. $200 per student/week. Unified Outreach is a 501C3 Youth Arts Charity which has been Active in Seattle for over 10 years.

Register at www.UnifiedOutreach.com or call 206-371-1139 for more information on our Charity and out Summer Art Programs.

We are located at 4401 42nd Ave SW, West Seattle, 98116.

 

George Martin, Producer and Arranger for The Beatles, Dies at 90

Originally published at MSN

George Martin, the “Fifth Beatle” and British treasure who signed the Fab Four to a label contract when no one else would, produced virtually all their songs and introduced lavish arrangements into “Yesterday” and “A Day in the Life,” has died. He was 90.

Beatles drummer Ringo Starr shared the news on Twitter, writing “Peace and love… George will be missed.” A Universal Music Group spokesperson confirmed Martin’s death, though details are not yet clear.

The producer, executive, arranger, musician and British knight was behind a whopping 23 No. 1 singles in the U.S. and 30 in the U.K.

As head of EMI’s Parlophone Records, which then concentrated on jazz and comedy, Martin was on the lookout for a rock act when he met Beatles manager Brian Epstein in February 1962. Every other British label had passed on signing the foursome — John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Pete Best.

George Martin GETTY P 2016© Getty Images via The Hollywood Reporter George Martin GETTY P 2016 Martin called their demo made for Decca Records a month earlier “rather unpromising,” but there was something about those Lennon-McCartney harmonies, so he scheduled The Beatles for a recording session at EMI’s Abbey Road studios in June. He liked what he heard and signed them up. (The Hollies would later join Parlophone as well.)

Martin chose not to promote one of them as the frontman, suggested they replace Best (studio drummer Starr came on board) and allowed them to record their own material. Their first single, “Love Me Do,” peaked at No. 17 on the British charts.

For The Beatles’ first U.S. single, “Please Please Me,” in November 1962, he convinced the boys to speed up the tempo. It proved to be a smash hit. “Gentlemen, you have just made your first No. 1 record,” he memorably told them from the control room.

Martin also served as The Beatles’ arranger. He suggested strings be added to “Yesterday,” which would become one of the most covered songs of all time, and conducted the string section for “Eleanor Rigby.” He played piano on “In My Life” and composed its harpsichord section; was responsible for the breathtaking orchestral windup in “A Day in the Life;” and used backward tapes to help shape the psychedelic elements of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Martin described his relationship with The Beatles in his 1979 book, All You Need Is Ears.

“I must emphasize that it was a team effort,” Martin wrote. “Without my instruments and scoring, very many of the records would not have sounded as they do. Whether they would have been any better, I cannot say. They might have been. That is not modesty on my part; it is an attempt to give a factual picture of the relationship.”

PAUL MCCARTNEY, GEORGE HARRISON, RINGO STARR AND JOHN LENNON RECEIVE A SILVER DISC FROM GEORGE MARTIN IN LONDON, BRITAIN IN 1963© KEYSTONE USA/Rex Shutterstock PAUL MCCARTNEY, GEORGE HARRISON, RINGO STARR AND JOHN LENNON RECEIVE A SILVER DISC FROM GEORGE MARTIN IN LONDON, BRITAIN IN 1963 Martin received an Academy Award nomination for best music, scoring of music, adaptation or treatment for The Beatles’ 1964 classic film A Hard Day’s Night, directed by Richard Lester; arranged the score for their 1968 animated movie Yellow Submarine; and scored, with Paul and Linda McCartney, the 1973 James Bond film Live and Let Die.

He also worked on such film as Crooks Anonymous (1962), The Family Way (1966) and Pulp (1972), which starred Michael Caine and Mickey Rooney.

In 2006, Martin remixed, along with his son Giles Martin, the music for Love, the Cirque du Soleil production that celebrated Beatles music in conjunction with Apple Corps. It included a new orchestral song, written by Martin, for a solo version of Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”

Martin also produced for Cilla Black (for her hit song “Alfie”), Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, Mahavishnu Orchestra, America, Jeff Beck, Cheap Trick, Ella Fitzgerald, Stan Getz, Kenny Rogers, Neil Sedaka, Jimmy Webb, Dire Straits, Peter Gabriel, Sting, Meat Loaf, Carly Simon, Celine Dion and Kate Bush, among others.

Martin was knighted in 1996 (a year before McCartney received the honor) and inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999.

Martin was born on Jan. 3, 1926, in Highbury, London. He received a few piano lessons as a child but mostly learned to play by himself and had “fantasies about being the next Rachmaninoff.”

Martin entered the Royal Navy, and after leaving the service in 1947, he received a government grant to study music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, a London college, where he learned composition, orchestration and how to play the oboe.

Martin said he decided to pick up the oboe because he figured it could help him earn a living, and indeed, it helped him score a job producing classical baroque recordings at Parlophone, run by Oscar Preuss.

Martin became the head of A&R in 1955 when Preuss retired and found success with such comedy records as Peter Ustinov’s 1952 novelty record “Mock Mozart” (Anthony Hopkins played harpsichord on one song) and worked with Peter Sellers, Spike Milligan, Peter Cook and Dudley Moore. Lennon, a big comedy fan, surely was impressed by this facet of Martin’s career.

In 1962, under the pseudonym Ray Cathode, Martin put out an electronic dance single, “Time Beat,” recorded at the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, which fueled his desire to find a rock ’n’ roll group with whom to work.

In 1963, records produced by Martin spent 37 weeks at No. 1 in the U.K.

He left EMI in 1965 but continued to work in a freelance capacity, producing The Beatles’ final album release, Abbey Road. (Phil Spector took over, for the most part, on the Let It Be album and documentary.) He opened the AIR recording studios in London and the Caribbean and attracted such artists as The Rolling Stones, Stevie Wonder and The Police to record.

Martin’s work with McCartney also included producing his albums Tug of War (1982), Pipes of Peace (1983) — which featured McCartney collaborations with Wonder and Michael Jackson — and Flaming Pie (1997). Along with his longtime engineer Geoff Emerick, Martin oversaw postproduction on an eight-track analog-mixing desk for platinum-selling compilations like Live at the BBC and Anthology, which featured unreleased songs “Free as a Bird” and “Real Love.”

Martin wrote three books, including his 1979 autobiography, All You Need Is Love, co-written with Jeremy Hornsby. He produced and hosted The Rhythm of Life, a BBC documentary series that highlighted artists and discussed musical compositions, and the 2011 documentary Produced by George Martin gained worldwide acclaim, offering an insider’s peak into the producer’s life.

In 1997, Martin rerecorded Elton John’s “Candle in the Wind,” originally written by John and Bernie Taupin about Marilyn Monroe but retooled as a tribute to Princess Diana. The song became the second best-selling single in history, and Martin called it “probably my last single. It’s not a bad one to go out on.”

A year later, Martin’s produced the album In My Life, on which artists and actors covered songs in The Beatles catalog; Robin Williams and Bobby McFerrin provided the vocals on “Come Together.”

Martin married Sheena Chisholm, whom he had met in the service, on his 22nd birthday in 1948, and after they divorced, wed Judy Lockhart-Smith, a Parlophone secretary, in 1966.

In addition to his son Giles, survivors include his other children Alexis, Gregory and Lucy.

Mike Barnes contributed to this report.

Originally published at:  http://www.msn.com/en-us/music/news/george-martin-producer-and-arranger-for-the-beatles-dies-at-90/ar-AAgy6z7?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=mailsignout

NEW HEAT ALERT:DRAZE UNVEILS THE “SEATTLE SWEETIES” MUSIC VIDEO

Originally posted by BigBoss ENT on November 15, 2015 at 2:59pm

draze hatSEATTLE, WA (November 13, 2015) – Seattle rapper Draze is proud to unveil the music video for his latest single “Seattle Sweeties,” here. Directed by Atuanya Priester (A Real Grip), this video celebrates the beauty and diversity of style, of women in the Northwest. Draze explains, “I know women from all over the country; and I can truly say there is nothing like a Seattle Sweetie. This is my own way of saluting them. I hope this video captures a little bit of their mystique.”
In true Draze form “Seattle Sweeties” is more than just a song or video, but rather a movement. Draze partnered with cafe and bakery giant, Cupcake Royale to create six new cupcake flavors that are available from now through November 22, at each Cupcake Royale location. Among the flavors are: Choco Latte, Lemon Cherry Blossom, Chai Cinnamon, Banana Cream, Caramel Delight, and Vanilla Dream. Draze expounds, “It is fresh to see my city buzzing about this song, these cupcakes and the entire movement. I am hoping that the video can be the cherry on top.” A portion of the proceeds from each “Seattle Sweetie” cupcake sold goes to benefit survivors of domestic violence through partners at “Runway to Freedom.”
WHAT’S NEXT FOR DRAZE
With a ringing endorsement from Seattle native, Macklemore, Draze is bringing a wave of momentum into this musical fourth quarter. Recently Draze’s music was featured on Fox’s hit show, “Empire”, ESPN’s “Sports Center” and MTV. In addition, Draze’s hit street single, “The Hood Ain’t The Same” a song highlighting the effects of gentrification, was archived at the Museum of History and Industry during a ceremony lead by Mayor Ed Murray. Draze’s newest single, “Seattle Sweeties” is available online here as a free download. Draze is set to release his new Mixtape titled “Seattle’s Own” soon.
Draze Seattle Sweeties

How Macklemore Conquered Addiction and Teamed With Rap Royalty for New LP

By

Originally Published at http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/how-macklemore-conquered-addiction-and-teamed-with-rap-royalty-for-new-lp-20150910

Photo copyright rollingstone.com

September 10, 2015 – An hour before they took the stage at MTV’s Video Music Awards in Los Angeles on August 30th, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis were sure their set was going to be a total disaster. The Seattle rapper-producer duo had just finished the final run-through of the performance — an ambitious outdoor version of their new single, “Downtown,” involving tricky choreography and multiple guest vocalists — and nothing was going right. “We watched the playback, and Ryan was bummed,” says Macklemore. “He was like, ‘Dude, this isn’t good. It’s going to be a s**show.'”

In the end, their first televised performance in more than a year went off without a hitch — but it was a high-stakes moment for more reasons than one. The last awards show Macklemore and Lewis performed at was the 2014 Grammys, where their platinum-selling The Heist beat out Kendrick Lamar and others for Best Rap Album. The backlash that followed was swift and brutal: Many fans saw them as symbols of the advantages that white artists have even in a historically black genre. Last fall, the rapper — who went sober in 2008, but relapsed into drug use during his sudden rise to fame — got clean again, and he says the 12-step philosophy has helped him deal with criticism. “There’s this tendency to be like, ‘Where’s the negative stuff? How valid is the criticism?'” says Macklemore. “But honestly, what people think of me is none of my business. If I live on the Internet looking for public approval, I’m going to be miserable.”

The day after the VMAs, Macklemore is calling from a mountain cabin in eastern Washington, where he and Lewis are putting the final touches on their follow-up to The Heist. “I’m feeling great about this album,” he says. “It has a diversity of sounds and textures and concepts. We’ve been able to take our time with it, and it’s a great feeling to get to that point.”

His relief at having gotten through the VMAs is audible. “It was intense,” he says. “You’re sitting in your seat, Kanye’s giving his speech 10 feet away from you, and you realize how many people are out there watching and commenting and judging and making memes. This Internet culture that we’re in feels so foreign and so strange sometimes. The VMAs, the Grammys, Twitter, Facebook — all of that is artificial. What’s real is creativity.”

The “Downtown” video has been viewed more than 11 million times on YouTube; the song is the result of an 18-month-long recording process that began when Macklemore and Lewis were on tour somewhere in the American Midwest. “Ryan made a beat called ‘Moping Around,’ and I thought it was about mopeds,” Macklemore says with a laugh. He began writing rhymes about the vehicles that he and Lewis had bought to relieve the monotony of life on the road. Lewis took this theme as a production challenge, building “Downtown” into a five-minute epic packed with stylistic detours into Seventies rock, show tunes and more. “We worked at whatever studios were available when we had random ideas,” Lewis says. “There was a long time when I didn’t think I was going to be able to capture what was in our heads.”

RISE OF THE ETERNALS ~ HIP HOP IMMORTALS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

October 8, 2015 – With the recent launch of the Legacy of Hip Hop exhibit at Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) the city has been buzzing with debate about who should top the list of Seattle’s most iconic artists to have represented this genre over the years.

What was most amazing to me as I walked through the MOHAI exhibit was that I saw the names of Bboys that I knew about based on recent performances. Yet, the exhibit had information on them dating back to the early 1980’s.

Because of the vibrant history of NW Hip Hop there will always be heated debate about who was/is/will be the greatest in any one of the 5 elements (Breakdancing/DJ’ing/Rapping/Graffiti/Knowledge). Believe me, it is easy to get pulled into that conversation. However, for purposes of this article I would like to focus on something else; the eternals of NW Hip Hop.

This column lists 10 artists who I feel have never left the game. But have represented the genre for the past 4 decades. I felt like I needed to share the list; because there just isn’t anyone writing about Seattle Hip Hop that actually has any roots in the community.

So here is the list. These are the realest of the real.

Coolout crewNo automatic alt text available.
10. Gordon (Music Inner City) Curvey and Georgio (Coolout Network) Brown (1990 – Present)

Element:  Knowledge
Two hip hop historians documenting the going-on’s in the hip hop community for a quarter century. Definitely two different personalities; with Gordon engaging in semi-regular public arguments with just about everyone on Facebook. Meanwhile, Georgio Brown keeps it cool. Constantly building bridges and giving local artists stage time at his
annual Coolout events (the 25th of which will be celebrated in 2016!) Georgio recently helped design and promote the MOHAI event; while Gordon was less than impressed with acknowledgement of his contributions.

Image may contain: Gregory Buren, smiling9. Greg (Funk Daddy) Buren and Derrick (Vitimin D) Brown (1988 – Present)

Element:  DJ/Producers

Are these two the same person? Both broke out around 1988. Both hit the ground running; putting out some major beats and haven’t taken a break in almost 30 years. These two have to share the spot, because both are legendary producers in the Northwest. Funk Daddy (aka Greg B) from Seattle and Vitimin D from Portland.

Image may contain: 1 person 8. Ishmael (Butterfly) Butler (1988 – Present)

Element:  DJ/Producer/Rapper

Founding member of Digable Planets. Grammy winner. Currently performing with Shabazz Palaces.

 

7. Derrick (Silver Shadow D/Derrick X) Seals (1985 – Present)

Element:  DJ/Producer/Rapper

Member of the seminal Seattle rap group DURACELL. 30 year history of active performances and musical releases. Vast knowledge of Seattle’s music and hip hop culture from the 1990’s. Current member of 206 Zulu.

Image may contain: Terrell Johnson, hat and closeup6. Michael (Edwag) Johnson (1983 – Present)

Element:  Bboy, Rapper

Edawg was a founding member of the Gail Place Rockers (aka Horton hand-spinners) before launching his music career as a member of the Mixalot posse. Edawg has over 30 years in the hip hop game and is a platinum selling recording artist. Currently hosts E’s Way Radio and regularly preforms both past and current hits.

 5. Carter (Fever One) McGlasson (1983 – Present)

Element:  Bboy, DJ/Producer

Founding member of the 1983 Seattle Circuit Breakers as well as a current member of the legendary Rock Steady Crew. Fever still performs in Bboy contests and also currently DJ’s at multiple clubs in Seattle.

Image may contain: 1 person, standing, beard and outdoor4. Nathan (Sire One) Hivick (1990 – Present)

Element:  Bboy, Graffiti Artist, DJ/Producer, Rapper

One of the few artists to represent all 4 of the original elements; Sire One has over 25 years of producing music and visual arts that is as fresh today as it was when he began. Still competing in (legal) graffiti art competitions as part of BAM crew, and performing with both North City Rockers and 206 Zulu.

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people dancing, shoes and indoor 3. Dave (Pablo D) Narvaez (1984– Present)

Element:  Bboy, Rapper, Knowledge

Founder and current manager of the North City Rockers; a multi-generational breakdance group in North Seattle. Recognized as one of the Northwest’s most knowledgeable hip hop historians and widely respected for his photo documentation of the hip hop community over the last decade via Studio Narvaez. Currently working on music production with Specs Wizard and Sire One.

 

Image may contain: 1 person2. Danny (DJ Mr. Supreme/Supreme La Rock/Preme) Clavisilla (1983 – Present)

Element:  Bboy, DJ/Producer, Knowledge

DJ Mr. Supreme (along with RSC legend DV One) is the current DJ for the Seattle Seahawks. Founding member of the 1983 Seattle Circuit Breakers. Regularly produces music scores for movies & television. Widely considered one of the foremost experts on both NW music and NW hip hop in the world.

 

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

1. Michael (Specs Wizard) Hall   (1979 – Present)

Element:  Bboy, Graffiti Artist, DJ/Producer, Rapper

Currently produces a line of comic books for Capstan Media/Healthy Bunch. Regular music releases and performances throughout 2015. Featured artist at the MOHAI exhibit.

 Thank you for taking time to read.  I hope you enjoyed the list!  Let me know what you think!  Agree?  Disagree?

10 Biggest Seattle/Tacoma Celebrities

Originally posted at http://seattle.about.com/od/artsevents/tp/biggestcelebs.htm.

Seattle may not be a magnet for entertainers like New York or Hollywood, but with its high quality of life, strong arts culture, and uber-educated populace, Seattle generates more talent per capita than anywhere else.

Let’s count down the biggest names in arts and entertainment (sorry, Bill Gates) to call Seattle home. People like Ray Charles who spent on a brief—but formative—period here are disqualified. These people all came from the Seattle area or spent a large portion of their life here.

10.  Terry Brooks

You probably won’t recognize Terry Brooks in line for coffee, but he’s a rock star of the fantasy publishing world. With 22 New York Times bestsellers and several robust fantasy series to his name, including The Sword of Shannara, he is one of the most successful living writers. Brooks lives in West Seattle, routinely holds book readings in town, and has set large portions of his Genesis of Shannara series in Seattle and the Northwest. With the fantasy genre “hot” in Hollywood today, several of Brooks’ works have been optioned by major studios and may soon make their way to the silver screen.

copyright RollingStone.Com9.  Ann and Nancy Wilson

While these sisters were born in California, their family soon settled in Bellevue. The talented sisters were associated with a few now-defunct Northwest bands before finally forming Heart, the most successful female-led hard rock band of all time, with hits like “Magic Man” and “Barracuda.” After a hugely successful heyday in the ‘70s, the sisters went their separate ways musically a few times, but eventually officially reformed Heart and now tour regularly. The Wilsons have remained an active force in the Seattle music scene and greater community.

8.  Dave Matthews

Although the alterna-crooner was born in South Africa and earned his musical chops in Virginia, he’s called Seattle home for over ten years now, and is probably Seattle’s most frequently sighted celeb. He’s a regular at certain restaurants near his Wallingford home (no, I can’t tell you which ones) and his twin daughters attend school here. While many years have him on the road with his band-mates he has stated unequivocally, “This is my home now.”

7.  Frances Farmer

Her name may not ring any bells among younger readers, but for a few brief years Farmer was one of the biggest stars in Hollywood. Farmer was born in Seattle in 1913 and went to West Seattle High School before becoming a sensation at the University of Washington School of Drama. She quickly became a major star in the late 30s, appearing in such hits as Rhythm on the Range (with Bing Crosby) and Come and Get It. Despite her breakaway success, Farmer always bristled against the Hollywood lifestyle. Soon she became more famous for her struggles with mental illness and her precipitous fall from grace (for a time she worked sorting laundry at the Olympic—now Fairmont—Hotel in Seattle).

6.  Quincy Jones

Quincy Jones may not be thought of as a Seattle musician, but the all-time great composer, producer, and arranger grew up in Bremerton and attended Seattle’s Garfield High School. Jones went on to have one of the most broadly successful careers in music history, receiving Oscar nominations for films scores, and worked with a “who’s who” of 20th century pop music, including Frank Sinatra, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Ray Charles, Aretha Franklin, and, most famously, Michael Jackson. While his musical career has taken him away from the Northwest, Jones has returned numerous times, accepting awards from his alma mater and the Northwest African American Museum.

5.  Kenny G

This titan of smooth jazz was born Kenneth Gorelick in Seattle and attended Franklin High School. After graduating from the University of Washington, Kenny G quickly became a successful jazz instrumentalist (playing with Barry White on tour) and eventually recorded his own work. His massive, multi-platinum success was unprecedented for an instrumentalist, Kenny G not only dominated but expanded the audience of smooth jazz. While his slick sound has inspired innumerable detractors, he has sold over 70 million records and continues to be a popular performer.

Copyright RollingStone.com
Copyright RollingStone.com

4.  Kurt Cobain For an entire generation, Seattle and Kurt Cobain are almost synonymous. The Grunge movement Cobain led in the early 90s shot Seattle to a cultural prominence it had never enjoyed before. Cobain grew up in the logging town of Aberdeen, and was drawn into the burgeoning 80s punk-rock scene in Olympia and Seattle. Cobain formed Nirvana with fellow Aberdeener Krist Noveselic, and soon channeled his uncanny command of melody and adolescent rage into huge rock hits like “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” and radically transformed rock music in the process. After marrying fellow grunger rocker Courtney Love, Cobain moved to Seattle where he lived with his wife and child until a struggle with depression, stomach pain, and heroin led to his suicide at 27.

3.  Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix’s three years of stardom are among the most influential in the history of pop music. He was born in Seattle and attended Garfield High School. His first gig was in the basement of a Seattle synagogue, Temple De Hirsch. Hendrix later toured with the Isley Brothers and then went to London, where he became the singer-songwriter-guitar-phenom that launched him to worldwide fame. Hendrix ushered in a heavier guitar sound into the psychedelic rock world, and also inspired R&B acts to incorporate more rock elements into their sound. After his untimely death due to alcohol and sleeping pills, Hendrix was buried in Renton, Washington. Seattle’s Experience Music Project was largely built to honor Hendrix’s legacy.

2.  Bruce Lee

Those only casually familiar with the martial arts great may assume Lee was born in Hong Kong or China. In fact, Bruce Lee was born in San Francisco and spent seven critical years (from age 19 to 26) in Seattle. He worked in a Chinese restaurant on Capitol Hill (now since demolished), attended Seattle Central Community College and the University of Washington, taught his unique brand of martial arts in various city parks and at his own studio in the U-District, met and married his wife Linda Emery here, and was ultimately buried here. Indeed, Bruce’s well-tended grave in Capitol Hill’s Lakeview Cemetery is a major destination for his enduring legion of fans.

 - © Bing Crosby Enterprises1.  Bing Crosby

38 number one singles. The top-selling musical act for two straight decades. A break-out movie career that followed. Over a half a billion records sold. Who could this be? Michael Jackson? Elvis? No, it’s Tacoma’s own Bing Crosby. Bing was born in Tacoma in 1903 and later attended Gonzaga University in Spokane, where he formed his first jazz band. While he spent most of the rest of his life in Hollywood, Crosby always held a fondness for the Pacific Northwest and returned here numerous times.
Bing Crosby in Vancouver. © Bing Crosby Enterprises

 

Originally posted at http://seattle.about.com/od/artsevents/tp/biggestcelebs.htm.

COMMUNITY POSTINGS WARN OF DANGER; ASK MAYOR FOR EQUAL REPRESENTATION

  WN CD

October 3, 2015, Saturday evening drivers entering Seattle’s CD and Rainer Valley were greeted with hundreds of warning posters alerting them to dangers in Seattle’s Central District and South End of town.  The large red print on a black background shouts “Warning!  Entering the Central District!” and “Warning!  Entering Rainier Valley!”

While on the other side of the posters; drivers leaving these areas were greeted with a bright and colorful sign reading “Welcome! Now exiting the Central District/Rainier Valley!”

WLC CD

Members of Equal Representation Now say that the problem of youth on youth violence in the area is being overlooked by city officials and are asking for equal representation in regards to city policy.

In the summer of 2014 neighborhoods in these areas saw an unprecedented rise in youth on youth violence and murders, with almost daily reports of gun fire and nearly 20 youths murdered at the hand of other children.  Summer 2015 we saw the continuation of this violence with multiple murders, and much like the previous summer most going unnoticed by local media.

The organizers of tonight’s event note that in other areas of the city our leaders react differently to violence and threats of violence.  “On Capitol Hill the reaction to threats of violence was to put together a task force, engage LGBTQ leaders, and even go as far as to paint crosswalks to show solidarity and that (the threat of) violence would not be tolerated.”  We applaud the City’s quick action in this case of the verbal threats and harassment on Capitol Hill. However, the African-American community in Seattle is actually losing lives; and we are being told that the find-it-fix-it campaign is enough.”

The East African community in Seattle has community leaders that represent themselves and hold advisory positions in the Mayor’s office.  The LGBTQ community has leaders from the LQBTQ community that hold advisory positions in the Mayor’s office.  Yet when it comes to the African-American community we are told that adult AA males who were born and raised in these very neighborhoods are not best suited to advise on African-American youth in the area.

In 2014 the Mayors Office was presented with a proposal for the creation of an Office of Inner-City Affairs to help address the problem of youth violence Seattle’s CD and Rainer Valley.  The proposal was rejected as City Hall felt that there were adequate programs in place to address the issues; despite the evidence that youth-on-youth violence was escalating.IMG_20151003_185739

Organizers of tonight’s event hope that this display will be the catalyst to start people asking why there is not equal representation of communities in the Mayor’s Cabinet; and that maybe the Mayor will take another look at the previous proposal.

“We posted these signs because people need to know what they are driving into.  These neighborhoods are not safe.  There is a much greater chance of being shot and killed in this area than in any other part of Seattle.  Especially if you are a young, African-American male.”

“There are a lot of things that City Hall deals with on a daily basis; but few are truly a matter of life and death. When we see true leadership in the area from grassroots community groups such as Rose Prayer Ministries, B.U.I.L.D., and others it gives us hope.  But these voices need to have the Mayors ear!“

Reaction to the signage has been mixed, with mostly positive support for addressing the issue of youth violence and the loss of life in the African-American community.  However, there are some who disapprove of the message and have started their own campaign of removing the posters.

-JP Scratches

PHOENIX JONES STOPS ATTEMPTED MURDER!

Phoenix Jones - Guardian of Seattle Streets!
Phoenix Jones – Guardian of Seattle Streets!

September 23, 2015 – When Seattle police approached a suspect with their guns drawn over the weekend, it wasn’t random. And it wasn’t related to race, as bystanders alleged.

Seattle’s superhero Phoenix Jones can verify that. He was there for the whole thing. In fact, he is credited in the Seattle Police Department’s crime blotter for describing the scene, which the victim refused to do after he was taken to Harborview Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries.

Phoenix recalled the story for KIRO Radio’s Jason Rantz.

Just one day after his first MMA victory, Phoenix was patrolling Capitol Hill when he came across three suspects viciously beating a victim, with one repeatedly pistol-whipping and kicking the man. After alerting police, Phoenix ran into the man with the weapon, knocking the gun away.

“I sprinted out as fast as I could and hit him with a right hand,” he said. “The gun popped out, only the scary part was he didn’t get knocked out.”

At that point, the other two guys went for the gun and Jones knew he was in danger. Not wearing his traditional Kevlar suit, Phoenix fled briefly for safety.

That’s when Seattle police officers arrived, which prompted the suspects to disperse into the crowd, trying to blend in.

It didn’t work. Phoenix cornered one of the trio until cops arrived, and the other two were apprehended.

The suspects, all African American, are 21, 29 and 30. During a pat down, Officer Nic Abts-Olsen found a handgun on the 30-year-old suspect. The suspect claims it’s not his gun.

Phoenix told Rantz that the 30-year-old man was casually walking away from the scene when police drew their guns on him. Without any context, someone witnessing that scene would think it was stereotyping or think police were using excessive force. The thing is, the man had a gun in his pants and blood on his clothing.

Mixed Martial Artist with World Series of Fighting coming off a big win on 9/19/15.
Mixed Martial Artist with World Series of Fighting coming off a big win on 9/19/15.

During the arrest of these three suspects, Phoenix was shocked to hear passers-by jeer at the officers, suggesting they were only hassling the men because of their race.

This didn’t sit well with Phoenix.

“All black people are about to get mad at me but stop with the ‘Black Lives Matter’ crap,” he told Rantz. “Stop it. All lives matter.”

Phoenix said witnesses were “standing on the sidewalk, with these cameras, yelling at [the cops], telling me not to get close. There’s a difference between cops abusing their power and cops doing their job. Get your facts right and let the cops do their job. The last thing we need is an impotent police force.”

Without any context, people were making assumptions, but they didn’t know what was actually happening, he said. These men were trying to blend into a crowd. Police were not stereotyping or using excessive force. Bystanders didn’t have all the details.

“Later, they pat him down and find out he’s a felon,” Phoenix said.

And let’s not forget, Jones watched the man cave in the head of another with the butt of a gun.

People have to start taking context into consideration, Rantz agreed.

“There is a lot of assumption that the cops are always bad,” Rantz noted. “Cops are not arresting people simply because they are not white.”

Had the police been more aggressive toward the guy, Phoenix would have taken issue with how the situation was handled. But for knowing that the man had a gun, they were gentle, he explained. They even apologized while they cuffed one of the suspects, just in case they had the wrong guy, he continued.

The incident is an example of why Phoenix says he is frustrated with the Black Lives Matter movement. People are taking things out of context and using that against police.

“Crime is just crime,” Phoenix said. “There’s not a color that goes with it.”

The beating is something that the superhero seemed to foreshadow recently when he said crime in Seattle is evolving.

Originally published at http://mynorthwest.com/992/2814472/Phoenix-Jones-helps-stop-murder-rails-against-Black-Lives-Matter.

SEATTLE MUSEUM OF HISTORY AND INDUSTRY HONORS HIP HOP (here’s what I saw!)

Mohia 2September 23, 2015 – The Legacy of Hip Hop at the Museum of History and Industry (HOHAI) will run September 19, 2015 through May 1, 2016. This trip through NW hip hop history is a fun way for elder b-boys to take a walk down memory lane, and for the younger generation to learn about those that came before them.

It’s well worth the $14-$17 entry price to see some of the once-in-a-lifetime artifacts which include championship dance trophies won by Seattle’s own Massive Monkees, 30 years of cd’s, tapes, and records from iconic rappers and Dj’s such as the Emerald Street Boys, Sir Mixalot, B-Mello, DJ Mr. Supreme, Specs, and more.  Also on display are iconic jackets from Nastymix Records (the Seattle label founded by Mixalot and Nasty Nes), Macklemore, and Mecca wear.

The event features a “tag wall” (pen & paper) for visitors to “get up”, as well as a series of live performances from both established and up-and-coming artists (Dumi, Nya, Specs, and more).

MohaiNoticeably missing from the display is the contribution of Seattle’s first breakdance groups “the Emerald City Breakers” and “Seattle City Breakers” and their founding members Junior Alefaio and Carlos (Slamalotte) Barrientes; as well as multi-generational hip hop icons Dave (Pablo D) Narvaez, Rafael Contreras, Donald (Ziggy) Puaa, and Nathan (Sire One) Hivick.  However, even with these stars omitted the display is still very comprehensive in it’s presentation and has received very favorable reviews from many in the old school community.

Curators Jazmyn Scott (The Town Entertainment) and Aaron Walker-Loud (Big World Breaks) freely admit that there are major gaps in the exhibit and that the amount of hip hop history and artist contributions is just too big to include everyone; but they hope that the exhibit will at least shine a spotlight on some of the talent that has existed here for the past 30 years.

It’s not even that it’s my (or our) version of the story. It is an attempt to put into historical context, something that has been widely overlooked for years. We have acknowledged from day one that there are gaps; there is no way to tell the entire story. With this, we hope to give a glimpse into SOME of the people, places and things that make up this very rich culture in our town. It is only a starting point. Maybe someone else will pick up the torch or support us in making it even more comprehensive.” ~ JS.

The program features an interactive exhibit with historic audio recordings, photography, artwork, and more.

For more information on NW Hip Hop including artists not featured in the MOHAI exhibit please visit the following link:

VP 2

https://kingcountynews.org/2014/11/11/deepest-roots-30-years-of-hip-hop-in-seattle/