LOCAL RAPPERS C-DOGG and RAZ SIMONE TEAM UP “AROUND the WAY”

 

While we’re currently here on Earth, inhabiting these physical vessels, it is each individual’s responsibility to be the architect for the life they desire. As such, one has the power to actively choose to manifest and live the life they want – whether an individual chooses to thrive and live in their light or succumb to the comfortable complacency of their darkness is solely that person’s decision to make. But, based on the thoughts, words and actions you consciously or subconsciously decide to put out into the Universe, the Universe will return to you exactly what you send out.

So take your power back.
Far too often, people surrender their personal power to exterior forces – be it money, relationships, jobs, environment, dis-ease, etc. Despite all the “darkness” that seems to be taking up space around the world today, we are living in extremely auspicious times. And now, perhaps more so than ever, is the time for each and every being on this planet to take back, embrace and recognize just how absolutely and limitlessly powerful we are.
With “Around The Way”, Raz Simone links up with Clayton “C-Dogg/B-ragg” Bragg to demonstrate the power of using your time and energy to build up another individual while simultaneously putting on display how recognizing your own power can help to inspire and influence those around you. In doing so, “Around The Way” allows both Simone and C-Dogg to play their hand in making this world a better place.
At only 22 years old, C-Dogg has been surviving and thriving through all the obstacles God has placed before him, including a lifelong bout with cerebral palsy. And no obstacle is put in your way to stop you – they are only there to help your growth and help push you to recognize your own power. With 27 surgeries under his belt, 11 of which have been on his heart, the determination and the drive of C-Dogg has helped to inspire a number of people who have witnessed or heard his powerful story.
One of the people inspired by C-Dogg is Raz Simone. Although they don’t have the “same problems”, Simone and Clayton have both inspired each other with their ability to overcome adversities. In Raz’s own words, the two have the same spirit. And that spirit does not quit, does not surrender, and it certainly does not give up it’s power – it’s internal light – to exterior forces.
As Raz points out on “Around The Way” with a slick double entendre, his work is “always quality” and he never stretches it. Anyone familiar with Simone’s body of work recognizes the Black Umbrella founder has a catalogue abundant in both quantity and quality – he’s not cutting corners or laying down half-assed verses in order to get content out there. So, even when he’s helping out his people, Simone isn’t going to hop on a track just for the hell of it. According to Simone, he told C-Dogg he would only get on record with him if he was feeling it and, when it came to “Around The Way”, Clayton “slapped the mess outta [him] wit this one.”
A common theme when discussing Raz Simone is his authenticity and his realness. Being “real” does not always have to mean you’re “street” or “gangster” or anything along those lines – realness has more to do with an individual’s drive, dedication, heart and their authenticity. Realness comes from one’s ability to overcome even the hardest of adversities without getting trapped in the darkness. There are school teachers who are real, there are chefs and plumbers and cashiers who are real. Realness is about the individual in and of themselves, not the label placed upon them based on exterior factors.
In that sense, C-Dogg is real. And Simone is real.

As always, credit and praise must be sent to Simone’s go-to cinematographer, Jacob Hill. Feeling inspired by the energy of the experience, Hill went back to Black Umbrella HQ after shooting “Around The Way” and decided to edit and finalize the video that night. Instead of sleeping, Hill made sure the video was turned around in time for release overnight. That’s heart, dedication and sacrifice…that’s real. And not only did he come through with the quick flip of the video, but he cooked up a final product that gives off no sense of being rushed or half-assed. Ya’ll, there’s something to be said about work ethic

and it’s clear there’s a reason Hill is reppin’ Black Umbrella…

Much love to Raz, B-ragg and Jacob Hill for creating and sharing this beautiful message of acceptance and love. This that medicine the world needs a heavy dose of right now.
Experience “Around The Way” below and peep some older BTS footage of Raz and B-ragg in the studio here.
Originally Published at https://yeezytaughtmehappythoughts.blogspot.com/2018/01/raz-simone-around-way-feat-b-ragg-video.html

WEST SEATTLE GETS ANIMATED

mascot-split-david-toledo-2

October 19, 2016 – The Alaska Junction District of West Seattle is known as an Artist hub so it’s no surprise that it’s home to one of Seattle’s favorite cartoonists, David Toledo. David is the Program Manager for the Unified Outreach youth-arts program which has operated for nearly 2 decades and regularly teaches a summer and winter break day-camp with a focus on cartoon animation.

meet-the-mascots-cartoon-david-toledo-seattleDavid’s current project is called “the Mascots” which when completed will be a 30-minute animated feature scheduled to debut at the 2017 Emerald City ComiCon.  As with most 30-minute cartoon programming the time will be divided into 3 individual cartoon shorts averaging about 10 minutes each.  The first 10-minute episode titled “Join the Band” is currently viewable at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTUZ60sbfR8

 

 What’s the cartoon about?  

The Mascots are 4 friends dealing with peer pressure, girl troubles, and trying to make the “team”. It’s everything you’d expect in the lives of your average, all-American, teenage…. Animorphs?

the-mascots-cartoon-able-fader-meets-jelly_david-toledoDavid says “Everyone is familiar with the superstar mascots that strut their stuff through the world’s biggest sports arenas – bringing smiles to children and firing up the fans in the stands! But have you ever wondered about their lives outside of the spotlight? Life BEFORE they made it to the main stage?”

David Toledo is the Creator, Writer, Illustrator, and Animator of “Meet the Mascots” and also voiced multiple characters who appear in the Pilot Episode including the (4) Leads. Joining him for the pilot episode is a small group of voice-over talent that includes some very well known artists in Seattle’s hip hop community.

Meet the Voices featured in the Pilot Episode:

credits end MASCOTS

robert-anderson-dj-icemanRobert Anderson (DJ Iceman) has been a DJ for 33 years. originally from Brooklyn, New York; he’s been a staple in the South Sound Music scene since he moved to Tacoma Washington in 2007. He is a proud member of 206 Zulu and has been a Wu-Tang DJ since 2011. you can currently hear him on Wednesdays at 7 pm on www.wild1radio.com on his “Sure Shot” radio show.

 

c-dogg-clayton

Clayton Bragg (C-Dogg) is a rapper and video-blog host living in Edmonds, Washington (just north of Seattle).  Born in Des Moines and raised in Snohomish County, Clayton graduated high school in 2009 as a proud Panther.

Clayton was born with conical heart defect and cerebral palsy, but that has not stopped him from pursuing his love of music.  You can follow C-Dogg on twitter at handicapbragg, or at https://www.youtube.com/user/rappercdogg.

mz-music-girl2

Christina Virgillo-Emery (Mz. Music Girl) is a DJ at Zulu Radio and can be heard at www.kbcs.fm or on 91.3 fm.

Born and raised in Culver City (L.A.), California, Mz. Music Girl moved to Washington State in summer 1995, and became a member of 206ZULU in 2005. She enjoys music, turntablism, traveling,  arts & crafts,  sports, and many other things!

 

cinnamon-2

Cinnamon Rosa the founder of Village Keepers; a youth-focused outreach program in Tacoma, Washington; and a  Food Equity Leader for the Puyallup Watershed Initiatives Just & Healthy Food System.  Cinnamon’s role within the “Meet the Mascots” project also includes script consultant and character development.

 

 

faderAble Fader is veteran Hip Hop DJ, Music Producer, Event Promoter, Mobile DJ, Graphic Designer, Web Developer and Recording Artist. Able has been creating art within Hip Hop culture since 1987 and DJing since 1994. He is founding resident of (((THE JAM))) a popular Hip Hop club night on second Fridays at Vermillion on Seattle’s Capitol Hill as well as HOME SLICE a monthly showcase of local NW Hip Hop talent at Seattle’s historic The Crocodile. Able collaborates actively with many of Seattle’s most respected artists and is a member of both 206 Zulu and the Filthy Fingers United producer collective. http://fade.graphics
Music/Mobile DJ Website: Thubba Thubba: http://thubbathubba.com

voices-staff

 

Additionally, there will be plenty of opportunities for local artists to partner on the project as it moves forward. There is a Facebook page where updates will post; as well as open-calls for voice-over artists, cosplay actors/actresses, and others interested in being part of the program.

FACEBOOK PAGE:

https://www.facebook.com/SeattleMascots/posts

VIDEO CLIP:

UNIFIED OUTREACH YOUTH ARTS PROGRAM

www.UnifiedOutreach.com

Donation Splash 3

If You Have One Of These Old Seattle Rap Albums It May Be Worth Thousands!

P. Lagiarist

ESBMay 29, 2016. Got old Seattle rap albums collecting dust on a shelf somewhere? Maybe you already reclaimed the space and they’re sitting in an attic long-forgotten. Hopefully you didn’t throw them out, though, as it turns out there might be quite the market for some old Seattle Rap records. Modern engineering practice for music releases and re-releases tends to include adding or editing the original playlist from the original album version. While some people (squares) don’t mind or even enjoy these changes, real Seattle OG’s believe the original cut is worth spending the additional cheddar.

This translates to listings on eBay for certain Rap records at astronomical prices. It’s unknown if these early Seattle Rap albums will reach the level of other Seattle musician’s such as Patrinell Staton’s “Little Love Affair” which sold for $3500; but we’ve seen several Seattle Rap albums such as original copies of the Emerald Street Boys early releases and Sir Mixalot’s early Nastymix singles regularly going for $500 – $1000. It is believed that Indie Seattle Rap records in particular might be valuable to collectors for other reasons. Local DJ and Hip Hop Icon JP Scratches says “Early Seattle Rap LP’s are a rarity. Finding an early eighties cassette tape from Seattle is hard enough; but finding records is nearly impossible.” Because of this, certain Seattle Rap collectors are convinced that these LP RECORDS are worth something.”

Seattle Rap Ebay

According to Seattle Hip Hop Historian and Legendary DJ Mr. Supreme, the “white-whale” of Seattle Rap is the rumored 2-copy pressing by Sir Mixalot contemporary “Baron Von Scratch”. If one of these copies was to ever surface there is no telling what sort of numbers the bidding might reach.

Chilly UPtownOn the hot investment list are pre-1992 LP Records by Seattle Rap Artists the Emerald Street Boys, Sir Mixalot (Nastymix label), Incredicrew featuring Chelley Chelle, Chilly Uptown, High Performance, Criminal Nation, Kid Sensation, and Moving Target featuring David Toledo/Dawny Toledo/Esera Mose.

While it’s possible some Rap records are indeed worth quite a bit, you may also be able to find some of the more heavily produced (aka successful) artist material (Such as Sir Mixalot, Edawg, and Kid Sensation) at a very reasonable price.

LIKE THIS? YOU MAY WANT TO VISIT “DEEPEST ROOTS, 30 YEARS OF HIP HOP IN SEATTLE

https://kingcountynews.org/2014/11/11/deepest-roots-30-years-of-hip-hop-in-seattle/

Hip Hop Royalty Theatrical Debute

(Seattle, Washington) June 17-18, 2016 marks the highly anticipated return of Hip Hop emcee, producer, and organizer Danny “King Khazm” Kogita, with a double album release and theater production entitled “Diaries of a M.A.D.” The first show at the newly renovated Historic Washington Hall.

Diaries of a M.A.D. is an interdisciplinary installation, uniquely bridging music, cinema, and performing arts in an intimate exploration of struggle and perseverance. The album is laden with crisp snares, warm kicks, and dusty samples produced by members of Dev From Above, Third Eye Bling and Khazm and his beat crew, The Konstructicons. The soundscapes of this autobiographical essay paint a dark lacquer of social commentary.

The stage show produced by Olisa “Spyc-e” Enrico, is an artistic interpretation of how a biracial, disabled youth was able to overcome challenges in Seattle’s South end. An amalgam of Hip Hop, Japanese culture and disability awareness; the conceptual musical performances, blended with visual projections, dance and theatrical segments, push the boundaries of what is and what can be.

In 2003, King Khazm, along with his rap group- Cyphalliance, emerged onto the Northwest Hip Hop scene with exceptional response with debut album “Industreets.” A barrage of technological mishaps and life prevented the long awaited follow up album from seeing the light of day- until now.

One decade later, Living as a M.A.D. has been miraculously recovered, and after several months of extensive reconstruction, the album will finally be released. This sonically diverse project, recorded at Seattle’s renown Pharmacy, includes production by Jake One, Vitamin D, DJ Tre, Kitone, and others. The soundscape ranges from socially conscious lyrics to smooth melodic vocals.

Diaries of a M.A.D. and Living as a M.A.D. both release on Fresh Chopped Beats / MADK Productions and will be available at iTunes, Amazon.com and finer Hip Hop specialty stores.

For more information and announcements, visit www.freshchoppedbeats.com

King Khazm “Diaries of a M.A.D.” Theatrical Experience
June 17-18, 2016
Washington Hall
153 14th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122
Doors 7:00pm / Curtain 8:00pm
$25 General / $35 VIP / $5 Students 18 & Under
Tickets at BrownPaperTickets.com

 

NEW HEAT ALERT:DRAZE UNVEILS THE “SEATTLE SWEETIES” MUSIC VIDEO

Originally posted by BigBoss ENT on November 15, 2015 at 2:59pm

draze hatSEATTLE, WA (November 13, 2015) – Seattle rapper Draze is proud to unveil the music video for his latest single “Seattle Sweeties,” here. Directed by Atuanya Priester (A Real Grip), this video celebrates the beauty and diversity of style, of women in the Northwest. Draze explains, “I know women from all over the country; and I can truly say there is nothing like a Seattle Sweetie. This is my own way of saluting them. I hope this video captures a little bit of their mystique.”
In true Draze form “Seattle Sweeties” is more than just a song or video, but rather a movement. Draze partnered with cafe and bakery giant, Cupcake Royale to create six new cupcake flavors that are available from now through November 22, at each Cupcake Royale location. Among the flavors are: Choco Latte, Lemon Cherry Blossom, Chai Cinnamon, Banana Cream, Caramel Delight, and Vanilla Dream. Draze expounds, “It is fresh to see my city buzzing about this song, these cupcakes and the entire movement. I am hoping that the video can be the cherry on top.” A portion of the proceeds from each “Seattle Sweetie” cupcake sold goes to benefit survivors of domestic violence through partners at “Runway to Freedom.”
WHAT’S NEXT FOR DRAZE
With a ringing endorsement from Seattle native, Macklemore, Draze is bringing a wave of momentum into this musical fourth quarter. Recently Draze’s music was featured on Fox’s hit show, “Empire”, ESPN’s “Sports Center” and MTV. In addition, Draze’s hit street single, “The Hood Ain’t The Same” a song highlighting the effects of gentrification, was archived at the Museum of History and Industry during a ceremony lead by Mayor Ed Murray. Draze’s newest single, “Seattle Sweeties” is available online here as a free download. Draze is set to release his new Mixtape titled “Seattle’s Own” soon.
Draze Seattle Sweeties

Hip Hop History, Creativity, and Diversity Celebrated at Washington Hall

November 28, 2014 ~ The timing was perfect as earlier this month Governor Jay Inslee proclaimed November as Washington State Hip Hop History Month; following the lead of Mayor McGinn and the Seattle City Council who in 2010 proclaimed November Hip Hop History Month in Seattle.

Washington Hall celebrated Hip Hop History with an all-star performance line-up of Seattle’s biggest names in rap music; along with some of the nation’s top break-dancers sharing the stage. Musical artists participating in a freestyle open-mic “cypher” included platinum selling artist E-Dawg, along with city favorites Suntonio Bandanaz, B-Ragg, Sammy Tekle, Ernesto Iraheta, and more!

David Toledo Studio Narvaez Clayton Bragg
B-Ragg on the mic with David Toledo and Pablo D in back.

 

On stage were DJ’s Able Fader, Cues, Sureal, and A.C. who kept the place rocking from start to finish.

DJ Sureal
Tamao George Yasutake aka DJ Sureal

There was a delicious potluck buffet and a toy drive to help the B.U.I.L.D. Seattle Christmas giving-tree.

The event was sponsored by 206 Zulu, Seattle City Breakers, Unified Outreach, and Studio Narvaez, in partnership with 4Culture and Rane. It was organized by Nathan (SireOne) Hivick and hosted by the North City Rockers Ernesto Iraheta and Pele’ Ross, along with the fabled Specs Wizard.

The event will be the last break-dance celebration at Washington Hall for the next nine months as the facility begins to undergo renovations to restore the historic building and the install a new elevator; allowing special needs and wheel-chair bound visitors to enjoy the facility without limitations.

The elevator installation will be a blessing to special-needs artists with limited mobility, such as 206 Zulu founder and President Danny (King Khazm) Kogita who has been in a wheelchair since childhood. Also other artists such as Clayton (B-Ragg aka C-Dogg) Bragg who has limited mobility due to cerebral-palsy.

Clayton Bragg and E Dawg
Edawg and Clayton (B-Ragg) Bragg

Clayton is a rapper from Lynwood, Washington who as has a video channel on YouTube which provides regular album reviews for NW CD releases. Clayton has been spending time in the studio and is expecting his album out in early 2015. It was after reviewing the E-Dawg CD “How Long” that Clayton was contacted with a special invitation to attend the November 28th performance as E-Dawg was headlining the event.

David Toledo (Unified Outreach) made all arrangements and acted as Clayton’s personal assistant throughout the evening; physically carrying the artist up 3 flights of steps to the performance hall and making sure that Clayton had full access to E-Dawg and the other artists as well as great seating for all performances.

“It was great having B-Ragg attend the event. He’s doing a lot with his video blog and he’s hard at work in the studio. The crowd really enjoyed hearing him rap tonight; and with his own album coming out we believe that one day he’ll be headlining one of the shows.” David Toledo said.

Clayton Bragg David Toledo E Dawg
E-Dawg, B-Ragg, and David Toledo

Clayton said he really enjoyed the show and is especially excited about the people he was able to meet in person including E-Dawg, Seattle City Breaker’s founder Carolos (Slam) Barrientes, King Khazm, and most importantly DJ Sire One and Pablo D who occasionally act as guest hosts on Boom Box Radio; a Everett-based rap program that broadcasts on Friday nights at 10pm on station KSER 90.7 Fm. Clayton is looking forward to having his new album break on the show.

The event was also attended by a bevy of local celebrities including Georgio Brown from Coolout Tv and Dave (Pablo D) from Studio Narvaez; the two partnered in October for a Hip Hop Celebration at the Experience Music Project (EMP). Also attending were TYRONE “the Working Class Hero” Dumas, members of the North City Rockers, the Vicious Puppies, Massive Monkees, Seattle City Breakers, Circle of Fire, and other famous groups.

Sammy Tekle Vicious Puppies
Breakdancer and MC Sammy Tekle

Highlights of the night were an all-girl breakdance cypher which saw the return of Seattle’s old school b-girls Amber Jamieson and Jojo Tabora-Dyckhoff to the dance floor; as well as a “Seniors Classic” which featured “Seattle’s first b-boy” Junior Alefaio.

Judges for the night included the incredible Rigo Jones, Seattle City Breakers founding father Carlos “Slam” Barrientes, and consummate b-boy Rafael Contreras.

Donte Almenzor Junior Alefaio David Toledo Carlos Barrientes Raphael Contreras Robert Farrell
Old School Icon’s: (L-R) David Toledo, Donte Almenzor, Carlos Barrientes, Junior Alefaio, Raphael Contreras, Robert Farrell

Wrapping up the evenings events Sam “Preach” Dumas, founder of the (Masters of the Prep aka Party People in Action dance crew) issued a challenge to 1980’s dance rivals “the Ducky Boys” to meet at the same time next year for a “prep only” dance off; reviving a rivalry that goes back to 1985 and the Seattle Bandstand television show.   Will the Ducky Boys accept the challenge? We’ll know in exactly 12 months!

With construction estimated to take 9 months the event organizers hope that everything will be ready in time for the 2015 Hip Hop History Month celebration. Next year’s event promises to be on for the ages!

2015 JP Scratches

Story and photos may be reprinted in their entirety.

Sir Mix-a-lot and other music stars are featured in ‘Rockin’ Garages’ book

Sir Mix-a-Lot, Billy Joel, Sammy Hagar, J Geils, Keith Urban, Brian Johnson (AC/DC), Brad Whitford (Aerosmith) and John Oates (Hall and Oates) are among the music stars featured in the new book, “Rockin’ Garages: Collecting, Racing and Riding with Rock’s Great Gearheads” by authors Tom Cotter and Ken Gross (192 pages, $35, Motorbooks).

The book offers a pretty-cool, behind-the-scenes look at some big music celebrities and their automotive obsessions. Sir Mix-a-Lot is shown with his 2008 Lamborghini Murcielago, which he says he bought sight-unseen off eBay, and Hagar (“I Can’t Drive 55”) with his Mustang GTs and Ferrari 599 GTB. Photography is by Michael Alan Ross.

Sir Mix-a-Lot also talks about his first car, a 1969 Buick Electra 225:

“It was my first car, an ‘Exorcist’-vomit green, deuce-and-a-quarter,” he says. “It had a big dent in it. ‘Hooptie’ was what we called a raggedy old car back in the day.”

In the foreward, author Gross (a notable automotive journalist and guest curator at LeMay – America’s Car Museum in Tacoma) writes:

“When Tom Cotter asked me to help with a book on rock musicians who are car enthusiasts, I thought it was a great idea.

“My uncle ran a jazz nightclub, and I worked there when I was a kid. My son Chris Barron is the lead singer of the triple-platinum award-winning rock group Spin Doctors.

“I’ve had the privilege of knowing a lot of musicians. And I’ve met a few rockers who were serious car guys. So I thought it would be easy … It wasn’t.”

(Previously published at GENE STOUT)

Georgio Brown – The man behind the Northwest’s “Coolout Network”

Coolout 1    (Georgio Brown)

For 20 years Georgio Brown’s “Coolout Network” has introduced us to hot new talent; and since 1991 the show has kept fresh and evolving. From the early days of “Club Coolout” to its move to webisode format in 2007, Georgio has proven to be a man on with his finger on the pulse of the City.

For those of us around in the early 90’s, we remember the hot local video & dance show shot on location at clubs like the Rock Candy and DV8, and community center’s such as the Langston Hughes Cultural Arts Center.  “Club Coolout” featured kids dancing in a “Soul Train” setting interspersed with videos from local artists.  The weekly broadcast allowed viewers to get to know local musicians such as Kid Sensation, Specs, Incredicrew, D’Armageddon, Edawg, and a number of others; as well as hip hop dancers such as Sam Dumas and PPIA.

Coolout throwback  (Throwback)

Georgio first caught the video production bug when he was in high school (back in 1980’s New York), where he would film local rappers and B-Boys. This took off for him as he saw how much people enjoyed and were inspired by the shorts he created.  In 1991 Georgio found his way to Seattle, Washington and the rest is history.

In April of that year Georgio began producing a series of videos focusing on Seattle’s Hip Hop scene. These shorts turned into the “Coolout Network” which began airing on Seattle Public Access television stations.  The program has not only been a doorway to success for dancers and musicians, but also for those artist’s trying to break into radio and television broadcasting such as B-Mello and Sacha Starr.

Georgio has worked with Non-Profit performance arts programs and arts education programs and is often used for community awareness.  In the summer of 2004, Georgio Brown and Coolout Network were honored by the City of Seattle, receiving the Mayor’s Award for Excellence in Hip Hop for his dedication to create a positive contribution to the community.

In 2009 Georgio won local film-maker of the year at the Langston Hughes African American Film Festival with a short he shot and produced about the 206 Zulu Nation.  Georgio credits this film with lighting a fire in him to tell more stories about NW hip hop. And now that Georgio has announced his 5 year hiatus from Coolout, he plans on immediately jumping into his next project; a collaboration between himself and Scott Macklin, along with NW hip hop historian Mike Clark with will culminate in a full length feature documentary about the Evolution of Hip Hop in the Northwest.

Today Coolout TV can be seen on the following sites: youtube.com/coolouttv, vimeo.com/georgiobrown, facebook.com/georgiobrown.

“There are a lot of talented people in the Northwest that need and deserve attention and Coolout is the platform that can help them get the exposure and inspiration they need” – Georgio Brown.

Coolout cartoon  (Coolout Cartoon)

Glen Boyd, West Seattle Music Scribe

If Seattle is known for one thing it’s music; Quincy, Jimi, Kurt, and so on – You know the list.  And as recent as 10 years ago the music industry was a completely different animal than we see today.  Last decades musician’s had to fight, grind, and struggle to make it.  No internet, no YouTube to get your name to the masses.

Boyd NEs
Glen and Nasty Nes 1990

Often it wasn’t a matter of talent, or even hard work that made the difference, but knowing the right people behind the scenes – Seattle’s very own star-makers.These people were, once upon a time; record store owners that stocked and sold the product, radio Dj’s that drove the sales, and fanzine & newsprint journalist’s that wrote reviews and gave fans a behind the scenes look at their favorite artists.  The “machine” was especially alive and well in Seattle in the 1980’s and 90’s, one of its key movers and shakers was Shockmaster Glen Boyd.

Glen Boyd had his hands in every aspect of artist promotion.  His record and tape store “Music Menu” was Seattle’s hot-spot for new music.  Located just blocks from Franklin High School in Seattle, kids would travel from as far as Tacoma or Everett just to pick up new stock.

Operating one of Seattle’s most successful record stores may have been enough for some, but that was just the day job; as Glen moonlighted as the pioneer of FM Rap radio with his show “Shock Frequency.”  Radio was obviously in his blood, as Glen went on to partner with Seattle’s “Godfather” of Rap Radio Nasty Nes Rodriguez as co-host of KCMU’s highly rated “Rap Attack,” (a partnership which they would also share as co-host’s of Seattle’s “Bomb Shelter Videos”).

I guess Glen didn’t need sleep, because he still found time to write reviews and news for a number of both local and national newspapers and magazines; such as The Rocket, The Source, Tower Records Pulse, and Spin.  As we said before, Shockmaster Glen Boyd had all aspects of the star-making machine running on full throttle.

His proudest achievement?  Being instrumental in the early career of award-winning artist Sir Mixalot.  It was a young and hungry Sir Mixalot that made regular trips to Glen’s record store to ask Glen to critique his newest demo-tapes.  Although sometimes drowning in product from local artist’s fighting for Glen’s approval, Mixalot’s music stood out as something special.  So much in fact that Glen began writing about the hot new artist in some of the Newspapers and Magazines, giving Mixalot the attention necessary to get the breaks he needed.

Glen continued working with Sir Mixalot and close friend and business partner Nasty Nes, and was a major player in the forming of Seattle’s first hip hop record label, “Nasty Mix”.  Mixalot provided the talent, Nes made sure the records were getting national airplay, and Glen was sure that the albums were available nationwide.  Glen’s reputation as a major player in the entertainment game was so stellar that it eventually caught the eye of (American Records) President and Founder Rick Rubin.  Before long Glen was making major calls as part of Rick Ruben’s inner circle.

Fast forward to 2011: It’s been years since Glen closed down the old record store, said “no thanks” to the late night radio shows, and left Rick Ruben’s empire to survive on its own.  Yes, Glen has returned to his roots in West Seattle for a more quite life.

But that doesn’t mean that there isn’t still fire burning in the Shockmaster.  Glen is still putting in long hours with his longtime mistress; music.  Although this time, it’s a slightly different arena.

Glen Boyd
Shockmaster 2011

Glen has (for the most part) given up rocking the airwaves, although you will still catch him from time to time doing a guest spot with (KUBE 93) Dj B-Mello, or his longtime friend Nasty Nes Rodriguez.  Instead Glen spends the majority of his time focusing on his writing.

 

You can find Glen’s still thought provoking articles on several internet blogs, his critiques of newly released albums as well as old favorites are available at theglenblog.blogspot.com, as well as blogcritics.org, and therockologist.com.   But what most Glen Boyd fans are most anxious about is the Unauthorized Neil Young Biography (Neil Young FAQ: Everything Left to Know About the Iconic and Mercurial Rocker) that Glen has just completed and is available at Amazon.Com and a number of other outlets.

So the next time you’re visiting the West Seattle Junction, take a minute to appreciate that you may be walking the same stones as the Shockmaster himself.  Appreciate that any restaurant or coffee shop on the strip could have been the place Glen sat while making (or breaking) your favorite musician’s career.

And if you happen to bump into Seattle’s favorite (music) scribe, understand that you have just touched greatness.

-JP Scratches